Summer Sewing with Tallinn Fabrics {Blog Tour}

Hey friends!!! I’m joining the talent-packed Tallinn Fabrics blog tour hosted by Jessica Swift for her debut fabric collection with Art Gallery Fabrics.

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If you haven’t been following along, hop back to her intro post here. The full tour schedule is at the end of this post, but before you go…let’s take a look at what I sewed up!

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You all have heard by now that my girls are really loving knit dresses because they are comfy, easy to put on and off and wash/dry without any ironing. Wait. Maybe I’m the one that loves the whole not ironing thing! HA!

I love playing with some good ol’ pattern mashing and hacking so I decided to sew up a Kennedy (woven pattern) with this super cute knit! To alter this pattern for a nice, fitted knit dress I simply took off the extra ease from the back bodice center and the waistband. Instead of a button placket, I sewed the back bodice together in the center, and made the waistband in the round. For the skirt, I kept true to the pattern pieces but chose to gather the skirt rather than pleat. I was afraid of the pleats would be finicky and stretch out while sewing so I took the easy route!

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Once I saw the colors and detail in the Baltic Swans Sand print, I just had to have it!!! I love the green and pink combo with the dark swan and light background contrast.

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I’m so thrilled to be a part of this great tour! I hope you enjoyed my stop and reading about how you can take this woven dress and make it with knit!

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Thursday April 19 – Mathew Boudreaux | Mister Domestic

Friday April 20 – Katie Skoog | The Simple Life Company

Monday April 23 – Sharon Holland

Tuesday April 24 – Eleri Kerian | Sew and Tell Project

Wednesday April 25 – Paola Baker | Love of Fabrics

Thursday April 26 – Maureen Cracknell

Friday April 27 – Alexis Wright | My Sweet Sunshine Studio

Monday April 30 – Isabelle Selak | South Bay Bella Studio

Tuesday May 1 – Cassie Massolia | Lily Shine Creates

Wednesday May 2 – Becca Plymale | Sunflower Seams

Thursday May 3 – Alisa Kutsel | A Stitch In Between

Friday May 4 – Sharon McConnell | Color Girl Quilts

Monday May 7 – Karen O’Connor | Lady K Quilt Designs

Tuesday May 8 – Sarai Schuk | Sarai’s Hobbies

Wednesday May 9 – Elise Baek | Elise & Emelie

Thursday May 10Jessica Swift

Friday May 11Gwyn LaSpina

Monday May 14 – Loni Jakubowski | Havin Sew Much Fun

 

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Bunny Ear Hair Clip Tutorial with the Cricut Maker

This post is sponsored by Cricut. The opinions expressed in this post are my own. Affiliate links are included.

Spring is near and it’s time to break out the pastels, the florals and of course the Easter themed crafts! I’m here today to share a super simple tutorial to create these adorable bunny ear hair clips using the Cricut Maker. You’ll be able to recreate these cute clips in just minutes and won’t have to cut out a single piece of fabric with the help of your handy Cricut Maker cutting machine.

This was my first Cricut Maker sewing project and it most definitely won’t be my last! I really found the process easy and quick to upload my own design, choose the correct material and tool and get right to cutting. I was able to multi-task and sew some of the ear pieces while the machine cut the next set.

This project takes about 20-30 minutes to complete, is great for a beginner sewist and those new to Design Space, and will give you two, adorable 4″ by 2″ bunny ear clips.


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Bunny Ear Hair Clip Tutorial

Supplies Needed:

Using the Cricut Maker

You’ll start by logging into Design Space and opening the Bunny Ear Cut File linked above. You can change the size and proportion of the main ear and ear contrast pieces. You can also only cut one set of each if you are using non-sew materials. If you are sewing your main ear and ear contrast pieces from fabric, you’ll want to be sure to have the two mirrored sets of each as shown below.

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The yellow mat shows the ear contrast pieces. In this sample, I used lawn fabric from Cotton and Steel. 

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You’ll select your materials for the ear contrast pieces. In this example, I chose Medium Fabrics (like Cotton), default pressure and the Rotary Blade tool.

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I placed a small piece of the cotton fabric onto the Fabric Grip cutting mat and loaded it to the Cricut Maker.

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After a quick peel of the fabric from the mat, I had the four ear contrast pieces.

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Next, you’ll load another Fabric Grip cutting mat with your main ear fabric. In this example, I chose white felt but you can cut from other woven fabrics if you prefer!

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Within moments, you’ll have your four main bunny ear pieces!

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Sewing the Bunny Ears

Place the two sets of bunny ear contrast pieces together, right sides together and raw edges lining up. Sew around the long edges of the ear contrast with a 1/4″ seam allowance.

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Notch around the curves or use pinking shears to trim the seam allowance. Use a tube turner and turn the ear contrast pieces right side out. Press.

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Place one ear contrast piece on one main ear piece as shown below. Sew to attach the contrast to the main using a satin stitch or small straight stitch.

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Place two main ear pieces (one with the contrast sewn on and one without) together, right sides touching and the raw edges lining up. Sew around the long edges with 1/4″ seam allowance.

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Use a tube turner again to turn the ears right side out.

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Attaching the Bunny Ears

Using a hot glue gun, attach one bunny ear to a hair clip. Other options would be to attach the ears to a headband, floral halo, fascinator, pillbox hat, etc.

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Embellishing the Bunny Ears

You can add fun embellishment such as leather bows, pom poms, flowers, etc. to dress up the bunny ears and help cover the clip.

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I hope that gets you inspired and prepared for spring sewing!!! If you create your own set of bunny ears from this tutorial, please tag me on Instagram! I can’t wait to see what you sew up!

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This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Cricut. The opinions and text are all mine.

{Sewing with Denim} Adding Embellishments & A FREE 3D Appliqué Tutorial

Hey friends! I am back to share with you a highly requested tutorial for the 3D appliqué you all saw on my instagram stories last week *and* to share some inspiration for denim embellishments!

Denim is great for apparel (obviously) but also great for featuring your clever and creative embellishments! A huge trend right now is hand embroidery and denim provides the perfect canvas (see what I did there) for your embroidered designs! I’ve shared a few of my faves from Pinterest below.

Denim is also great for other embellishments such as tassels, beadwork, pom trim, lace, etc. I’ve linked some of my favorite inspiration below.

Here’s why denim is so great for embellishments:

  1. It’s sturdy. When adding appliqués, beading, lace, etc. you need a good foundation in the fabric to work with or your embellishments will be floppy, may fall off, etc. Denim is a great substrate to use as it’s got the perfect weave and weight.
  2. It’s a blank canvas. Literally. Denim typically comes in a solid color or wash and therefore makes it super easy to add color and texture.

Have I convinced you to embellish ALL the denim yet?!?! If not…let’s take a look at this quick and easy tutorial to add a 3D appliqué to your favorite denim apparel!


How to sew a 3D applique

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Materials needed:

  • Apparel item (I chose the Catherine front bodice for this example, from Clay Traces streaked denim by AGF)
  • Fusible interfacing (quick shop affiliate link: Amazon)
  • Fussy cut fabric (you can cut two like I did, or just cut one main and one for the lining). By the way, “fussy cut” means to cut a specific area of the fabric print rather than just randomly cutting the fabric. In this case, I fussy cut out two moths.

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Step 1: Iron on the fusible web to the wrong side of the main appliqué piece.

You can opt to cut out the fusible web to the same shape as the appliqué first. This will keep your iron from getting gummy.

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Step 2: Place the main appliqué on the lining appliqué, right sides together. Sew carefully around the appliqué with a small seam allowance, leaving a small opening along a straight side. I used 1/8″ seam allowance since this is a tiny moth!IMG_9060

Step 3: Trim seam allowance at corners, clip into corners and notch curves. Be careful not to catch your stitches. Do not trim seam allowance at the opening.IMG_9062

Step 4: Use a turning tool to pull appliqué right side out through the opening. I love this tool (quick shop affiliate link).IMG_9063

Step 5: Press appliqué. Topstitch all the way around appliqué OR hand stitch the opening closed. IMG_9064

Step 6: Fold the appliqué in half, main sides touching. Press to create a crease.IMG_9065

Step 7: Place appliqué on the apparel item. If you are sewing more than one appliqué, you can lay out your arrangement before sewing to be sure you like the spacing and placement. Pin appliqué(s) in place. Sew a small line of stitches close to the fold to secure appliqué to apparel item. Repeat for remaining appliqués.  IMG_9066

Step 8: Finger press or use a light iron to press appliqué flat along the crease. You may also hand tack corners of the appliqué as you see fit. IMG_9068

How fun, quick and easy is that!??!!? Check out the finished look below:

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I hope you are feeling inspired and equipped to create some lovely 3D appliqués for your next denim apparel project! Please share if you do! Be sure to tag me on Instagram with @lilyshinecreates or send me an email so I can share!

 

{Introduction} Sewing with Denim

Hey sewing friends! I’d like to begin the New Year with several series to help you build confidence in sewing apparel and to encourage you to try new things. First up, we’ll be taking a look at sewing with denim! Let’s start by learning a little bit about denim and taking a look at various types and weights of denim that are great for apparel.


What are denim fabrics?

Denim fabrics are sturdy fabrics with a particular woven construction. Typically denim is made from indigo and white yarn but over time the term has come to reference various colors other than just blue.

What are the various types of denim best for apparel? I love using Art Gallery Fabrics denims for clothing. Let’s see their denim studio offerings:

  • Classic Denim
    • 100% Cotton
    • 4.5 oz/sqm weight
  • Textured Denim
    • 100% Cotton
    • 10 oz/sqm weight
  • Smooth Denim
    • 80% Cotton 20% Polyester
    • 4.5 oz/sqm weight
  • Linen Blends
    • 55% Linen 45% Cotton
    • 220 g/sqm weight
  • Lovey Dobby
    • 100% Cotton
    • 123 g/sqm weight
  • Crosshatch Textured Denim
    • 100% Cotton
    • 10 oz/sqm weight
  • Outland Yarn Dyes
    • 100% Cotton
    • 4 oz/sqm
  • Streaked Blend
    • 65% Cotton 34% Polyester 1% Spandex
    • 5 oz/sqm

When selecting the denim that is right for your project, pay attention to the weight of the fabric (shown typically in g/sqm).

Lightweight fabrics will be less than 150 g/sqm. You’ll want to choose lightweight fabrics for apparel that needs to have a good flow or will be fully lined. Ideas for apparel items: blouses, flowy skirts, children’s apparel, etc.

Medium weight fabrics are usually between 150 & 300 g/sqm. Medium weight fabrics are great for apparel patterns that need some structure but also allow for movement. Ideas for apparel items: pants, jackets, structured skirts, etc.

Heavy weight fabrics will be 300+ g/sqm. Typically heavy weight fabrics aren’t the best for kids apparel, so I tend to steer clear of them.

You’ll also want to pay attention to the fabric content. Any denims that include spandex (like the Streaked Blend from AGF) will have some stretch to it. Denims that have a combination of cotton and polyester will typically have less wrinkling or will shrink less in the wash.

You can read more about the various AGF denim offerings on their blog.

Here are some of my favorite denims. Simply click the photo (affiliate link) to shop. I’m curious if you recognize these fabrics from any of my previous sews????


Over the next few weeks I’ll be sharing sewing projects made from each type of denim offered by AGF. Which type of denim listed above are you most excited to see?? Leave me a note in the comments below!

In the meantime, shop around to find what type of denim you’ll need for your next apparel sewing project. You can also check out my Pinterest board I’ll be using during this series for more inspiration!

{Friday Favorites} Sewing for Valentine’s Day

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Love is in the air. Fabric love, that is! As each holiday approaches, the mad dash to the fabric store to find “the” fabric combination that will help create the most picture perfect holiday ensemble begins. I’m back for another round of Friday Favorites- this time all about Valentine’s Day! Let’s look at some of my favorite mushy, romantic prints and great patterns to coordinate! I’ve made it super easy- just click the image to shop (some contain affiliate links)!

Quilting Cottons

Liberty Fabrics Classic Tana Lawn Felicite White/Red
Sugar Berry Candied Roses Metallic Radiant Berry Fabric
Kaufman Sevenberry Petite Fleurs Flower Circle Red Fabric
Liberty Fabrics Tana Lawn Elizabeth Pink

Timeless Treasures Glamour Falling Rose Petals Cream Fabric

Cotton + Steel Clover Tulips Pink Fabric

Knits

Liverpool DoubleKnit Romantic Floral Coral/Scarlet/Peach Fabric


Techno Scuba Knit Rose Bouquet Pink/Coral on Hot Pink Fabric

Riley Blake When Skies Are Grey Jersey Knit Heart Black Fabric
Art Gallery 58'' Wide Paperie Happily Ever After Fabric


And now some of my favorite patterns just perfect for Valentine’s Day!

I’m a sucker for circle skirts for V-day! This Lacey dress has so much twirl and the vintage style is perfect for some of those romantic prints linked above!

Lace Wrap dress

The bright floral knits will be perfect for this circle skirted knit dress, Juilanna!Julianna Dress pattern

Amelia Misses pdf pattern

Since I’m hoping to sew more for me, I have to try this Amelia Misses pattern in gorgeous floral knits!

 


I hope this leaves you inspired and excited to sew some LOVE with these gorgeous fabrics and pdf patterns!!! Can you guess what ones I’m selecting for my girls and I?? Leave me a comment below!

Want to win a $25 gift card to Hawthorne Threads to help fund your inspiration for Valentine’s Day sewing?? Head over to my Instagram and enter to win!

{Beginner Sewing} FREE Download: Sewing Practice Sheets

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I know many set a New Year’s Resolution to learn how to sew, to get better at sewing or try new sewing techniques such as sewing apparel. I also know that many have gifted their children or grandchildren with sewing machines for Christmas and are now staring at the box thinking “Now What???” I brainstormed with my daughter how we could help motivate, encourage and educate those who are needing a little jumpstart into the realm of sewing. We came up with some great Beginner Sewing post ideas as well as a fun Instagram Highlight series. We hope you find these little tutorials helpful, fun and supportive as you jump into sewing!

Today’s post is really for those who have some basic knowledge of how to use their sewing machine, can set up their machine with thread and a full bobbin and that’s about it! If that’s not you- don’t worry, we have some more basic posts planned as well as some more advanced posts to reach as many skill levels as we can!

When I started teaching my oldest how to use her sewing machine at age 5, we started with sewing practice sheets on paper. When trying to just master a straight stitch or explore how to sew curves, using practice sheets will help you to build that muscle memory in your hands and your sewing foot (the one that presses your sewing machine pedal!). The cool thing about sewing practice sheets is that you can just print over and over to your hearts content! I’ve created 4 sewing practice sheets for the beginner that gradually advance in difficulty. Skip down to the end of this post for the full pdf download or print as images by clicking each sheet below.


Sewing Practice Sheet #1 focuses on sewing a straight line. You’ll start stitching at the top of the line and continue sewing to the end. The goal is to keep your stitch line as close to the dashed lines as possible.

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Sewing Practice Sheet #2 focuses on sewing straight lines, pivoting at the end of the straight line and continuing to sew. The goal is to keep your stitch line as close to the dashed line as possible. When you get to the end of the straight line, leave your needle down in the corner point, lift your presser foot, pivot the paper, lower your presser foot and continue sewing to the next corner.

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Sewing Practice Sheet #3 introduces curves. The goal is to keep your stitch line as close to the dashed curved line as possible. One helpful hint with curves is to not start and stop, push or pull the paper but rather just slowly manipulate the paper side to side as your needle tracks along the curve. Stopping and starting will cause sharp points and segments in the stitches rather than a smooth curve. This will take practice to build the muscle memory in your hands to learn how much give and how much go it will take to smooth the curve.

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Sewing Practice Sheet #4 focuses on a continuous curve. The goal is the keep your stitch line as close to the dashed curves as possible. You’ll need to get really good at sewing curves when you start to sew apparel- think necklines, sleeves, pockets, circle skirt hemlines, etc. A super valuable sewing skill so take your time and practice perfect practice!

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Full PDF Download: Sewing Practice Sheets

We hope you found these sewing practice sheets helpful!! We’d love to know your thoughts on the series and if you have any particular requests that we cover! Let us know in the comments below. If you’d like to follow along with our fun sewing videos, be sure to hop over to our Instagram and see the story highlights titled “Beginner Sewing.”

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Gift Guide: Stocking Stuffers for the Sewist

Hey all!!! Happy Holidays!!! First, let me just start by saying you may need to just copy and paste this link to your significant other if you aren’t the one doing the stockings this year…or just go ahead and click each link below and make yourself a nice wishlist to send to family and friends!! But, if you are one who just purchases for yourself- don’t worry- your secret is safe with me!! Click each photo to take you to my affiliate link.

I wanted to share a few of my favorite small sewing supplies that would make for great stocking stuffer gifts for the creative in your friend or family circle! I hope this is a helpful list and if I’m missing any- feel free to contribute ideas in the comments below!

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1. Acrylic Ruler. This will help you be super efficient when cutting rectangle pattern pieces or needing to measure and cut straight lines.

2. Titanium Rotary Cutter blades. If you’re like me and need to get through a few layers of fabric at once- theses bad boys are slick and sharp for the job!!

3. Hot Hemmer. Get an even hemline every time!

4. Walking foot. This varies by sewing machine brand but here’s a good round of up popular ones: Walking foot for sewing machines.

5. Seam Ripper. You can never have too many of these around! I love the silicon cap on this to erase and grab those pesky threads!

6. Tube Turner. Turning those tiny straps out can be troublesome, but not with this handy tool!

7. Bodkins. These will help you thread elastic through casings with ease.


8. Sewing clips. I had a major breakup with sewing pins…and these clips are a game changer, especially when sewing with knits!

9. Pretty Scissors. Sometimes we just want to use something extra fancy…plus they look super chic in an IG photo with your new fabric.

10. Frixon pens. These heat-erased pens are great for marking on fabrics.

11. Sewing Gauge. If you are constantly battling with buttonholes, this tool will help you evenly space and plan out your buttons!

12. Sewing Mugs. For all those late night, early morning sewing projects, a clever coffee mug can help you push through!


I hope that helps get you inspired for stuffing those stockings for all your sewing friends (or yourself…shhhhhh).

Happy shopping!

Blush Fabrics {Blog Tour}

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Hello friends!!! I’m back on the blog today to share my latest make with the most gorgeous Rayon print from Blush Fabrics by Dana Willard for Art Gallery Fabrics. Dana reached out to a great batch of sewing bloggers to join in on the fun with the Blush Fabrics blog tour! It has been so awesome to see what others have sewn up (and so many in this same print!) over the last several days. If you want to check them out, search the hashtag #blushfabrics and see what great things have been popping up on Instagram lately!

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For the tour, I decided to play with the rayon substrate. I *love* AGF Rayon because it’s got the most perfect flow and drape for maxi dresses. And in my house, maxi dresses = ultimate princess dress = mom of the year!

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I used Alexis’ newest pattern, Zoey, for Violette Field Threads with slight modifications (aka late night sewing and I tried to find a shortcut). Instead of finishing the bodice with bias along the neckline, ties and the front placket I decided to sew a lined bodice and add pom trim for the neck ties. A super simple modification that saved me lots of time and turned out super cute!

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This maxi dress made for the perfect dancing, twirling, and moody grinning attire!

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I hope you enjoyed seeing the new Zoey maxi I sewed up with the Floret Rayon in Sunkissed print from Blush Fabrics. Big hugs and a sweet “Thank You” to Dana and our AGF friends!!!! My girls adore this retro, pink and blue collection! Keep scrolling to see some more Blush Fabric makes on my girlies!!!

{Friday Favorites} Interfacing and Stabilizers

***This post contains affiliate links***

It’s time for another fun round of Friday Favorites! Today I’ll be sharing with you my favorite interfacing and stabilizers and where/when/how to use them!

First things first…I bet you are wondering what’s the difference between interfacing and stabilizers??? Super simple: interfacing is meant to be sewn into the project, stabilizers are meant to be removed after stitching. Interfacing gets sewn “in,” stabilizers just stabilize the fabrics for the moment. Makes sense right??? So let’s look at some of my favorites and talk about which projects match.


Interfacing

The two most common interfacings used when sewing clothing (which is where the majority of my creativity lies) are woven interfacing and knit interfacing.

Woven Interfacing: Used for woven fabrics. This interfacing will not stretch. It comes in various weights and can be used for a variety of helpful reasons. Some woven interfacing can be adhered to the fabric before stitching, called “Fusible Interfacing.” Woven interfacing does have a grain line, just like woven fabrics, so be sure to cut the interfacing just as you cut the pattern pieces!

For collars: I use lightweight fusible interfacing to help give a little body to collars. I adhere the fusible interfacing to the wrong side of the main collar piece before sewing to the collar lining. This will help keep the shape of the collar, but is lightweight so it won’t make the collar stick up.

For button plackets: I also use lightweight fusible interfacing to help my machine sew neat and easy buttonholes. I usually adhere the interfacing the wrong side of the main back bodice, about a 1″ strip the length of the button placket. The interfacing helps to stabilize the fabric while you sew the buttonholes, and also keeps the buttonhole from stretching out over wash/wear.

To hold fabric together: I use a thin strip of fusible web to set the main bodice and back bodice together when sewing an enclosed waist seam. The fusible web will adhere the two fabrics together and keep anything from shifting while enclosing the waist seam. No pins needed!

To keep zippers in place: My most favorite invention ever! After sewing a million Elodie dresses last spring, I would have been lost without my trusty Peel n Stick! You just peel off the amount you need (the length of the zipper), stick the adhesive to the inside of the garment, and then place the zipper on the tape (it’s double sided sticky!). Again- no pins needed!!! This keeps the zipper firmly in place while you flip the garment over and topstitch the zipper!

For free motion appliqué:  I use a lightweight Ultra Hold fusible webbing to keep fussy cut fabric appliqués in place. This will keep the fabric from shifting while sewing with your free motion foot.

Knit Interfacing: Knit interfacing will have stretch and provide some structure while sewing with knit fabrics.

For hemming: Using a thin strip of knit tape on the hem of a knit garment will give enough stability to keep the hem from twisting or bunching, but will not affect the overall drape of the garment.

For sturdy seams: To keep waist seams from going wonky, to keep shoulder seams from stretching or slumping over wash/wear, I use knit stay tape. This provides stability over time but doesn’t add any bulk to the seam.


Stabilizers:

Stabilizers provide body and structure just while sewing, but then are removed (torn away or washed away) after stitching.

Tear Away Stabilizer: This type of stabilizer is stiff but is only a temporary stabilizer. I often use tear away stabilizer when sewing buttonholes on knit fabrics. I don’t want the stiffness in the knit after I sew the buttonhole so I don’t use an interfacing. Instead, a tear away stabilizer will provide that sturdiness needed for a buttonhole and then is torn away.

Wash Away Stabilizer: This type of stabilizer is thinner, gives some structure while sewing and then will dissolve when wet. I use wash away stabilizer when sewing with delicate fabrics like hemming chiffons, binding with chiffon or sheer fabrics when I don’t want interfacing to show, etc. You can also use wash away stabilizer to embroider really pretty lace appliqués!


Color Coding for Interfacing and Stabilizers:

I thought I would also share some helpful tips when shopping for interfacing and stabilizers at your local fabric store or online. You can buy interfacing and stabilizer by the roll, in the notions section. It will come prepackaged, usually about 10-20 yds rolled or in sheets. However, you buy interfacing and stabilizers by the yard as well.

Some products are color coded to help you select the correct type of interfacing and stabilizer you need.

Pellon: Pellon is a popular brand, carried at Joann Fabrics and other fabric stores.

Pink: Apparel fabrics

Yellow: Craft and Home decor fabrics

Green: Quilting fabrics

Orange: Fusible webs and adhesives

Blue: Embroidery projects

Heat n Bond (Thermoweb): Another popular brand of packaged fusible webbing.

Purple: lite adhesive strength

Red: ultra adhesive strength

Blue: iron on vinyl

Yellow: Soft Stretch (for knit fabrics)

Light Blue: Featherlight (super thin and lightweight)

Pink: Hemming (no-sew)


I hope that helps to kind of debunk any misunderstandings or questions about interfacing and stabilizers! Both can be super helpful in sewing apparel or other sewing projects. I’d love to hear which interfacing and stabilizers you use the most, and if you’d like any specific tutorials showing how to use any mentioned above!

Tips & Tricks on Tuesday: Sewing Button Closures

*** This post contains affiliate links and I will be compensated if you make a purchase after clicking on my links***

What is your sewing nemisis? You know…the one part in a pattern or tutorial that makes you cringe, want to throw in the towel or go rouge and alter the construction? I see time and time again that sewists are scared of sewing garments made with buttons because they hate sewing buttonholes. Can you relate??? I hope to help you conquer that fear with a few handy tools and some tips to guide you to sewing perfect, easy buttonholes.

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First let’s talk about my favorite tools for sewing button closures (affiliate links):

This expanding sewing gauge will help you evenly space the buttons/holes without headache!

Fray check will keep your buttonholes looking neat and tidy!

Frixion erasable pens are perfect for marking on fabric. A little heat (such an a warm iron) will erase the pen marks from fabric with no trouble!


Now let’s look at how these tools will help you sew buttonholes without having to hold your breath!

Prep your bodice, skirt placket, etc. with lightweight fusible interfacing. I’ve applied the interfacing to the wrong side of the main bodice. This will help stabilize the buttonholes and buttons and make it much easier for your sewing machine to manage.

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First thing’s first- you need to decide how many buttonholes are needed. In my example, I’ll be sewing 4 buttonholes. I’ll start by sliding open the expanding sewing gauge to have 4 points on my garment.

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If you are attaching a skirt (like in this example) or have any restrictions on where the button/buttonholes can be placed, be sure to keep that in mind. In my example, I want to be sure the button is at least 1/2″ away from the top and 1 1/2″ away from the bottom of my bodice. I slide the sewing gauge until I had 4 points along my bodice with 1/2″ from the top and 1 1/2″ from the bottom.

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I like to lay out the buttons I’ve chosen to be sure the spacing looks good. I also mark where the buttons will be sewn so that can cross check with the buttonhole spacing.

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I love using my sewing machine buttonhole foot to sew the buttonholes. I especially love this one since it has a metal bottom and really grips nicely to my fabric. I find the size of the buttonhole will be by placing the button in the spot in the back (button guide). Then I double check that the buttonhole (shown by the pressure foot scale or the space between the two points that the automatic buttonhole arm travels) will fit.

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I use that space to mark where the buttonholes will begin and end on the left side of my bodice. Using a frixion erasable pen, I mark on the left bodice where the buttonholes should begin and end.

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After a quick run through the machine, I am ready to open up the seams. I place a pin at the end of the buttonhole so that the seam ripper doesn’t take off and rip through more.

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Lastly, you’ll want to apply a thin line of fray check along the buttonholes once seam ripped to keep them looking neat after wash and wear.

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Once your buttonholes are sewn and finished, overlap the bodices/plackets and double check that the buttons should be sewn in the same markings previously made. If all is good to go, use your sewing machine and sew the buttons to the other side of the bodice/placket. If you aren’t familiar with using your sewing machine to sew buttons, hop over to this great tutorial.

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Well there you have it! Button closures made easy!!! I hope that gives you a little more confidence to tackle those cute patterns with button closures. Happy sewing!

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