DIY Personalized Knit Skirt with the Cricut Easy Press 2

This post is sponsored by Cricut. The opinions expressed in this post are my own. Affiliate links are included.

Hey friends!!! I’m back for another fun collaboration with Cricut in their debut of the Easy Press 2. I’ve got a quick and easy knit skirt tutorial with a fun personalization using the Cricut Maker, fusible backed fabric and of course, the 9″ x 9″ Easy Press 2!! When my girls and I saw the beautiful new raspberry color for the Easy Press 2, we just had to make some skirts to match!

First, let’s take a look at this new product:

Easy Press 2

The Easy Press 2 is an update to the previously released Easy Press- a ceramic-coated device with precise temperature control up to 400 degrees F and even heating surface perfect for iron on projects! A few specs to admire:

  • Three sizes: 6″ x 7″, 9″ x 9″ and 12″ x 10″
  • Heats up faster than previous model & 60 seconds to iron on success!
  • USB port for firmware updates
  • Easy to use, simple to learn: each Easy Press 2 comes with a beginner project that will get you familiar with the device in a matter of minutes!
  • Digital display of temperature and time controls, beeps to notify user once pre-heated
  • Stylish raspberry color
  • Safety base included: insulated base will keep the Easy Press 2 and your crafting surface safe while the Easy Press 2 is not in use.

I chose the 9″ x 9″ size as most of my sewing projects are kid-sized. I love how I can complete an entire iron-on project with one simple press! Speaking of an iron-on project…let’s get to the DIY!!!


DIY Personalized Knit Skirt Tutorial

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Supplies Needed:

Getting Started:

1/2″ seam allowances included. 

You’ll want to set up your Cricut Maker with the rotary blade. Apply the fusible backed fabric to your cutting mat with the fusible side touching the sticky side of the mat, and the print of the fabric facing up. Be sure there are no wrinkles in the fabric and smooth it on the mat.

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Open the Design Space and locate the pre-made cut file here.

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You can change the name easily, but ensure each letter has its own color coding if you want to use different fabric for each letter. Use the Cricut Maker to cut out the letters.

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Cut a waistband and skirt piece from the knit fabric.

For the waistband, you’ll want to cut a 6″ tall rectangle. To figure the width of the waistband, measure the child around the smallest of the belly (for younger children, this is under the belly and above the hip) as this is where the knit waistband will sit. Subtract the total waist measurement by 1″. For this skirt, the child had a 20″ waist so I cut the waistband to be 19″ wide and 6″ tall.

For the skirt, you’ll want to measure the child from the waistband to the knee or where you’d like the skirt hem to hit. Add 1″ for seam allowance. For this skirt, the child measured 12″ from low belly to knee so I cut the skirt to be 13″ tall by the entire width of the fabric (most knit is 55″-60″ wide).

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Fold the skirt in half, bringing the short raw edges together with right sides touching. Fold the waistband in half, bringing the short raw edges together with right sides touching. Sew the skirt along the side seam and finish the seam with a zig zag stitch or overlock. Sew the waistband along the side seam.

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Use the Easy Press 2 to press the waistband seam open.

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Fold the waistband in half again, bringing the long raw edges together with wrong sides touching. Press using the Easy Press 2.

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Hem the skirt if desired. Prep the skirt by pre-heating for 15 seconds with the Easy Press2.

Place the letters in the bottom right corner of the skirt front, a few inches from the side seam and a few inches above the hem. Ensure the fabric print is facing up, and the fusible part is touching the skirt.

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Use the Easy Press 2 to bond the letters to the skirt. You can reference the Recommended Settings from the Cricut website to ensure you have your Easy Press 2 settings set for the materials used in your project. I set the Easy Press 2 to 315 degrees and the timer to 30 seconds.

Turn the skirt wrong side out and press again for half the previous time.

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Although many Cricut Iron On materials have a StrongBond Guarantee (Everyday, SportFlex and Glitter Iron are designed to outlast 50+ wash and dry cycles when used and applied as directed), it is still recommended that the fusible fabric be stitched to further adhere the fabric to the skirt. You can read more about the Cricut Fusible Fabric here.

Sew one or two rows of gathering stitches along the top raw edge of the skirt. Gather the skirt to the width of the waistband.

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Adjust the gathers and place the skirt on top of the waistband, right sides together, aligning the back center seam of the waistband with the back center skirt, and the skirt side seams with the side points of the waistband. Clip or pin the skirt to the waistband. Sew along the clipped seam.

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You have now created a Personalized Knit Skirt using the Cricut Easy Press 2!

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This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Cricut. The opinions and text are all mine.

Bunny Ear Hair Clip Tutorial with the Cricut Maker

This post is sponsored by Cricut. The opinions expressed in this post are my own. Affiliate links are included.

Spring is near and it’s time to break out the pastels, the florals and of course the Easter themed crafts! I’m here today to share a super simple tutorial to create these adorable bunny ear hair clips using the Cricut Maker. You’ll be able to recreate these cute clips in just minutes and won’t have to cut out a single piece of fabric with the help of your handy Cricut Maker cutting machine.

This was my first Cricut Maker sewing project and it most definitely won’t be my last! I really found the process easy and quick to upload my own design, choose the correct material and tool and get right to cutting. I was able to multi-task and sew some of the ear pieces while the machine cut the next set.

This project takes about 20-30 minutes to complete, is great for a beginner sewist and those new to Design Space, and will give you two, adorable 4″ by 2″ bunny ear clips.


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Bunny Ear Hair Clip Tutorial

Supplies Needed:

Using the Cricut Maker

You’ll start by logging into Design Space and opening the Bunny Ear Cut File linked above. You can change the size and proportion of the main ear and ear contrast pieces. You can also only cut one set of each if you are using non-sew materials. If you are sewing your main ear and ear contrast pieces from fabric, you’ll want to be sure to have the two mirrored sets of each as shown below.

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The yellow mat shows the ear contrast pieces. In this sample, I used lawn fabric from Cotton and Steel. 

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You’ll select your materials for the ear contrast pieces. In this example, I chose Medium Fabrics (like Cotton), default pressure and the Rotary Blade tool.

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I placed a small piece of the cotton fabric onto the Fabric Grip cutting mat and loaded it to the Cricut Maker.

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After a quick peel of the fabric from the mat, I had the four ear contrast pieces.

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Next, you’ll load another Fabric Grip cutting mat with your main ear fabric. In this example, I chose white felt but you can cut from other woven fabrics if you prefer!

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Within moments, you’ll have your four main bunny ear pieces!

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Sewing the Bunny Ears

Place the two sets of bunny ear contrast pieces together, right sides together and raw edges lining up. Sew around the long edges of the ear contrast with a 1/4″ seam allowance.

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Notch around the curves or use pinking shears to trim the seam allowance. Use a tube turner and turn the ear contrast pieces right side out. Press.

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Place one ear contrast piece on one main ear piece as shown below. Sew to attach the contrast to the main using a satin stitch or small straight stitch.

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Place two main ear pieces (one with the contrast sewn on and one without) together, right sides touching and the raw edges lining up. Sew around the long edges with 1/4″ seam allowance.

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Use a tube turner again to turn the ears right side out.

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Attaching the Bunny Ears

Using a hot glue gun, attach one bunny ear to a hair clip. Other options would be to attach the ears to a headband, floral halo, fascinator, pillbox hat, etc.

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Embellishing the Bunny Ears

You can add fun embellishment such as leather bows, pom poms, flowers, etc. to dress up the bunny ears and help cover the clip.

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I hope that gets you inspired and prepared for spring sewing!!! If you create your own set of bunny ears from this tutorial, please tag me on Instagram! I can’t wait to see what you sew up!

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This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Cricut. The opinions and text are all mine.

Quick & Easy Sewing with the Cricut Maker: A Review

This post is sponsored by Cricut. The opinions expressed in this post are my own. Affiliate links are included.

If you remember back to last summer, Cricut partnered with several sewing bloggers to initiate a #SewCricut collaboration. I was one of the fortunate few that were asked to try the Cricut Air Explore 2 and blog about a sewing project I created with the help from the Cricut machine. You can read my post and see photos of what I made here.

Well, lucky me…again! This time they sent the new Cricut Maker machine and asked that I share a review of the newest cutting machine in their lineup. I played around with the new Maker for about a month to get comfortable enough to share my thoughts. I’ll be back again in March to show you a sewing project I created with the Cricut Maker’s help so stay tuned for that follow up post!

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First, let’s talk about the details of the Cricut Maker and what sets it apart from the other cutting machines.

  • Most notably: Easily and quickly cuts through hundreds of fabric types without stabilizers needed using a rotary blade.
  • Compatible with hundreds of digital sewing patterns available in Cricut Design Space, including patterns from Simplicity and Riley Blake.
  • Easily and quickly marks seam allowances on fabric with the Washable Fabric pen.
  • Double Tool Holder means you can go from marking to cutting the fabric without having to change a thing!
  • New Adaptive Tool System™ with 10x the cutting force.
  • Can cut through many more materials such as leather, mat board, vinyl, paper, etc.
  • Thoughtful storage compartments on the top and in front flap.
  • Tablet or phone dock as well as a usb port to charge devices.

Here’s how the Cricut Maker can help you to complete sewing projects quickly and easily:

The fabric no longer needs to be bonded to something like stabilizer in order for the machine to cut it. The Cricut Maker has a rotary blade tool that works just like your handheld rotary blade. It’s super precise and can cut curves, tight corners, etc. without a snag! This means you can put your fabric directly on the mat and with a press of a button your pattern pieces can be cut out with precision and speed!

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The machine also can mark seam allowances and stitching lines with the Washable Fabric pen. When sewing small projects like doll clothes, accessories and such, having a clear seam allowance guide is super helpful. Since the pen and rotary blade can be in the tool system at the same time, you don’t have to change out anything in between tasks.

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The patterns in Design Space have step-by-step directions including size of fabric cuts, extra materials that may be needed, what to load on each mat, how to assemble (including full color photos), tips and also approximate time needed to complete the project. There is also the option to upload your own patterns, but I have yet to try this feature.

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For those sewing small projects like doll clothing, wallets and purses, hair accessories, small quilts, stuffed animals, baby shoes, etc. the Cricut Maker can cut out most if not all of your fabric pieces saving you tons time and energy! Also, Cricut has a super handy sewing kit that comes with the essential tools needed while sewing with the Cricut Maker.

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Here are a few photos to show you my first attempt at using the Cricut Maker for a sewing project. The Vintage Fabric Bunting Banner project is available in Design Space here.


Now to my thoughts on the Cricut Maker:

I really appreciate the extra storage, usb charging port and the increased cutting speed. Sometimes it’s the little things that totally win me over!

I am excited to utilize the rotary blade and sewing patterns to continue to help my 8 year old become an independent sewist. One area that tends to give me the most worry is having her cut out the projects as she is still developing her scissor cutting skills and isn’t quite mature enough to use a handheld rotary cutter. Having that step done safely and quickly with the Cricut Maker will allow us to spend more time working on her sewing skills and keeping her little fingers safe.

The larger fabric cutting mat (12″ x 24″) really opens up the possibilities in terms of sewing project size. No need to be constrained to tiny projects!

Cricut Design Space seems to be so intuitive for me to use and I love that the machine comes with a starter project. As soon as you plug your Cricut in and connect to a device, it literally walks you through a step by step project (materials included) to get you comfortable with the main features of the machine. The Cricut Maker came with a really great card with a small fabric feature. In completing the project, I learned how to install the pen to the tool dock, use multiple mats specific to the type of material used, install the rotary blade to cut fabric, and assemble a multi-layered project. In 5 minutes, I had a really great overview of how I can use the Cricut Maker to create amazing projects.

The Cricut Maker isn’t only for fabric- I’ve used mine so many times in the last month for all sorts of projects. I linked to the projects in Design Space so you can easily re-create them too!

Last minute Valentine’s Cards for my kids (last minute as in 10 pm on February 13th with a 10:35 pm bedtime!) with Natalie Malan’s paper.

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Personalized map artwork for my master bedroom with vinyl.

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100th Day of School tees for my kids (with their help!) using Iron On.

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A new front door mat using a stencil made from cardstock.

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I hope you found this review helpful and inspirational! Please let me know if you have further questions about the Maker and I will do my best to address them in the follow up post coming at the beginning of March. I’d love to hear your thoughts on this new cutting machine! Tell me your favorite feature or what you hope to sew using the Cricut Maker in the comments below!

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This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Cricut. The opinions and text are all mine.