DIY Personalized Knit Skirt with the Cricut Easy Press 2

This post is sponsored by Cricut. The opinions expressed in this post are my own. Affiliate links are included.

Hey friends!!! I’m back for another fun collaboration with Cricut in their debut of the Easy Press 2. I’ve got a quick and easy knit skirt tutorial with a fun personalization using the Cricut Maker, fusible backed fabric and of course, the 9″ x 9″ Easy Press 2!! When my girls and I saw the beautiful new raspberry color for the Easy Press 2, we just had to make some skirts to match!

First, let’s take a look at this new product:

Easy Press 2

The Easy Press 2 is an update to the previously released Easy Press- a ceramic-coated device with precise temperature control up to 400 degrees F and even heating surface perfect for iron on projects! A few specs to admire:

  • Three sizes: 6″ x 7″, 9″ x 9″ and 12″ x 10″
  • Heats up faster than previous model & 60 seconds to iron on success!
  • USB port for firmware updates
  • Easy to use, simple to learn: each Easy Press 2 comes with a beginner project that will get you familiar with the device in a matter of minutes!
  • Digital display of temperature and time controls, beeps to notify user once pre-heated
  • Stylish raspberry color
  • Safety base included: insulated base will keep the Easy Press 2 and your crafting surface safe while the Easy Press 2 is not in use.

I chose the 9″ x 9″ size as most of my sewing projects are kid-sized. I love how I can complete an entire iron-on project with one simple press! Speaking of an iron-on project…let’s get to the DIY!!!


DIY Personalized Knit Skirt Tutorial

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Supplies Needed:

Getting Started:

1/2″ seam allowances included. 

You’ll want to set up your Cricut Maker with the rotary blade. Apply the fusible backed fabric to your cutting mat with the fusible side touching the sticky side of the mat, and the print of the fabric facing up. Be sure there are no wrinkles in the fabric and smooth it on the mat.

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Open the Design Space and locate the pre-made cut file here.

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You can change the name easily, but ensure each letter has its own color coding if you want to use different fabric for each letter. Use the Cricut Maker to cut out the letters.

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Cut a waistband and skirt piece from the knit fabric.

For the waistband, you’ll want to cut a 6″ tall rectangle. To figure the width of the waistband, measure the child around the smallest of the belly (for younger children, this is under the belly and above the hip) as this is where the knit waistband will sit. Subtract the total waist measurement by 1″. For this skirt, the child had a 20″ waist so I cut the waistband to be 19″ wide and 6″ tall.

For the skirt, you’ll want to measure the child from the waistband to the knee or where you’d like the skirt hem to hit. Add 1″ for seam allowance. For this skirt, the child measured 12″ from low belly to knee so I cut the skirt to be 13″ tall by the entire width of the fabric (most knit is 55″-60″ wide).

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Fold the skirt in half, bringing the short raw edges together with right sides touching. Fold the waistband in half, bringing the short raw edges together with right sides touching. Sew the skirt along the side seam and finish the seam with a zig zag stitch or overlock. Sew the waistband along the side seam.

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Use the Easy Press 2 to press the waistband seam open.

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Fold the waistband in half again, bringing the long raw edges together with wrong sides touching. Press using the Easy Press 2.

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Hem the skirt if desired. Prep the skirt by pre-heating for 15 seconds with the Easy Press2.

Place the letters in the bottom right corner of the skirt front, a few inches from the side seam and a few inches above the hem. Ensure the fabric print is facing up, and the fusible part is touching the skirt.

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Use the Easy Press 2 to bond the letters to the skirt. You can reference the Recommended Settings from the Cricut website to ensure you have your Easy Press 2 settings set for the materials used in your project. I set the Easy Press 2 to 315 degrees and the timer to 30 seconds.

Turn the skirt wrong side out and press again for half the previous time.

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Although many Cricut Iron On materials have a StrongBond Guarantee (Everyday, SportFlex and Glitter Iron are designed to outlast 50+ wash and dry cycles when used and applied as directed), it is still recommended that the fusible fabric be stitched to further adhere the fabric to the skirt. You can read more about the Cricut Fusible Fabric here.

Sew one or two rows of gathering stitches along the top raw edge of the skirt. Gather the skirt to the width of the waistband.

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Adjust the gathers and place the skirt on top of the waistband, right sides together, aligning the back center seam of the waistband with the back center skirt, and the skirt side seams with the side points of the waistband. Clip or pin the skirt to the waistband. Sew along the clipped seam.

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You have now created a Personalized Knit Skirt using the Cricut Easy Press 2!

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This is a sponsored conversation written by me on behalf of Cricut. The opinions and text are all mine.

{Introduction} Sewing with Denim

Hey sewing friends! I’d like to begin the New Year with several series to help you build confidence in sewing apparel and to encourage you to try new things. First up, we’ll be taking a look at sewing with denim! Let’s start by learning a little bit about denim and taking a look at various types and weights of denim that are great for apparel.


What are denim fabrics?

Denim fabrics are sturdy fabrics with a particular woven construction. Typically denim is made from indigo and white yarn but over time the term has come to reference various colors other than just blue.

What are the various types of denim best for apparel? I love using Art Gallery Fabrics denims for clothing. Let’s see their denim studio offerings:

  • Classic Denim
    • 100% Cotton
    • 4.5 oz/sqm weight
  • Textured Denim
    • 100% Cotton
    • 10 oz/sqm weight
  • Smooth Denim
    • 80% Cotton 20% Polyester
    • 4.5 oz/sqm weight
  • Linen Blends
    • 55% Linen 45% Cotton
    • 220 g/sqm weight
  • Lovey Dobby
    • 100% Cotton
    • 123 g/sqm weight
  • Crosshatch Textured Denim
    • 100% Cotton
    • 10 oz/sqm weight
  • Outland Yarn Dyes
    • 100% Cotton
    • 4 oz/sqm
  • Streaked Blend
    • 65% Cotton 34% Polyester 1% Spandex
    • 5 oz/sqm

When selecting the denim that is right for your project, pay attention to the weight of the fabric (shown typically in g/sqm).

Lightweight fabrics will be less than 150 g/sqm. You’ll want to choose lightweight fabrics for apparel that needs to have a good flow or will be fully lined. Ideas for apparel items: blouses, flowy skirts, children’s apparel, etc.

Medium weight fabrics are usually between 150 & 300 g/sqm. Medium weight fabrics are great for apparel patterns that need some structure but also allow for movement. Ideas for apparel items: pants, jackets, structured skirts, etc.

Heavy weight fabrics will be 300+ g/sqm. Typically heavy weight fabrics aren’t the best for kids apparel, so I tend to steer clear of them.

You’ll also want to pay attention to the fabric content. Any denims that include spandex (like the Streaked Blend from AGF) will have some stretch to it. Denims that have a combination of cotton and polyester will typically have less wrinkling or will shrink less in the wash.

You can read more about the various AGF denim offerings on their blog.

Here are some of my favorite denims. Simply click the photo (affiliate link) to shop. I’m curious if you recognize these fabrics from any of my previous sews????


Over the next few weeks I’ll be sharing sewing projects made from each type of denim offered by AGF. Which type of denim listed above are you most excited to see?? Leave me a note in the comments below!

In the meantime, shop around to find what type of denim you’ll need for your next apparel sewing project. You can also check out my Pinterest board I’ll be using during this series for more inspiration!

{Beginner Sewing} FREE Download: Sewing Practice Sheets

Beginner Sewing graphic

I know many set a New Year’s Resolution to learn how to sew, to get better at sewing or try new sewing techniques such as sewing apparel. I also know that many have gifted their children or grandchildren with sewing machines for Christmas and are now staring at the box thinking “Now What???” I brainstormed with my daughter how we could help motivate, encourage and educate those who are needing a little jumpstart into the realm of sewing. We came up with some great Beginner Sewing post ideas as well as a fun Instagram Highlight series. We hope you find these little tutorials helpful, fun and supportive as you jump into sewing!

Today’s post is really for those who have some basic knowledge of how to use their sewing machine, can set up their machine with thread and a full bobbin and that’s about it! If that’s not you- don’t worry, we have some more basic posts planned as well as some more advanced posts to reach as many skill levels as we can!

When I started teaching my oldest how to use her sewing machine at age 5, we started with sewing practice sheets on paper. When trying to just master a straight stitch or explore how to sew curves, using practice sheets will help you to build that muscle memory in your hands and your sewing foot (the one that presses your sewing machine pedal!). The cool thing about sewing practice sheets is that you can just print over and over to your hearts content! I’ve created 4 sewing practice sheets for the beginner that gradually advance in difficulty. Skip down to the end of this post for the full pdf download or print as images by clicking each sheet below.


Sewing Practice Sheet #1 focuses on sewing a straight line. You’ll start stitching at the top of the line and continue sewing to the end. The goal is to keep your stitch line as close to the dashed lines as possible.

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Sewing Practice Sheet #2 focuses on sewing straight lines, pivoting at the end of the straight line and continuing to sew. The goal is to keep your stitch line as close to the dashed line as possible. When you get to the end of the straight line, leave your needle down in the corner point, lift your presser foot, pivot the paper, lower your presser foot and continue sewing to the next corner.

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Sewing Practice Sheet #3 introduces curves. The goal is to keep your stitch line as close to the dashed curved line as possible. One helpful hint with curves is to not start and stop, push or pull the paper but rather just slowly manipulate the paper side to side as your needle tracks along the curve. Stopping and starting will cause sharp points and segments in the stitches rather than a smooth curve. This will take practice to build the muscle memory in your hands to learn how much give and how much go it will take to smooth the curve.

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Sewing Practice Sheet #4 focuses on a continuous curve. The goal is the keep your stitch line as close to the dashed curves as possible. You’ll need to get really good at sewing curves when you start to sew apparel- think necklines, sleeves, pockets, circle skirt hemlines, etc. A super valuable sewing skill so take your time and practice perfect practice!

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Full PDF Download: Sewing Practice Sheets

We hope you found these sewing practice sheets helpful!! We’d love to know your thoughts on the series and if you have any particular requests that we cover! Let us know in the comments below. If you’d like to follow along with our fun sewing videos, be sure to hop over to our Instagram and see the story highlights titled “Beginner Sewing.”

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