Entryway Nook Makeover: Adding Fabrics to Your Home Decor

Embroidery Hoops

Spring is on it’s way and if you’re like me, you’re itchy to transition that winter decor into some bright and cheerful spring pieces! I had so much fun sprucing up this entryway nook, and I hope you had fun helping me along the way via our Instagram chats/polls! If we’re not already IG friends, please come follow along to see more behind the scenes, free tutorials each Thursday and all the fun in between the squares 🙂

Before we discuss the fun additions I’ve made to the space, let’s take a look at the most boring of boring “befores” of all time…

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Quick backstory on the bench: We received this beautiful bench as a wedding gift from my husband’s grandparents. It has made it’s way from Michigan to Hawaii to California and now to Texas. It has never, ever fit into a purposeful space in our homes until now. I had to celebrate this fit by really making this space pop! I smile each time I walk by this bench, mostly because of the sweet memories I have of my husband’s grandparents and their 50+ years of marriage but also because of the fresh decor it now boasts ❤

Adding Fabric to Embroidery Hoops

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I used fabric in two aspects to add color and warmth to this space. First, I made this super (duper) easy embroidery hoop wall art. The easiest tutorial ever to hit Tutorial Thursdays on Instagram. If you missed it, don’t worry…I saved it to my highlights so check there.

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I bought the embroidery hoops in a set from Amazon. The fabric is from the Gathered Collection by Bonnie Christine for Art Gallery Fabrics. I ordered them by the half yard from Hawthorne Supply Co. You could easily get away with Fat Quarter size pieces of fabric from your favorite quilt shop too!

Fresh Pillow Covers

The second way I incorporated this gorgeous fabric into this space was by making new pillow covers. Hey friends, I’ve got a tutorial for that too 😉 Head back to the highlights on my Insta and you’ll be ready to sew some new covers!

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And, my friends and I went back and forth on which fabric to use for the pillow covers…like 50/50 votes on the poll…so I just ended up sewing three pillow covers for each fabric print. Many suggested using the floral for spring and summer, and moving to the mustard for fall/winter but if you know me, I already have the next fabrics picked out for summer 😉

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Creating Coziness

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I had fun grabbing pieces throughout the house to bring in some more color and warmth to the space. The fiddle fig is real, and still alive (going on one month, yay!!!!). The faux greenery garland, ceramic vase and wooden beads are all from Hobby Lobby. The rose fringe blanket was a gift from my mother-in-law from Pier One. Baskets are from Target. Large pillows are from Home Goods

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I hope this post gives you some inspiration and motivation to incorporate fabrics into your home decor, even if you don’t sew! XOXO.

DIY Momiform: Basic Tees and Joggers

I made pants! I made pants!!! Have you heard…I made pants!!! HA! It was a huge goal of 2019 to sew more functional pieces to my wardrobe- especially pants- so I am super pleased with my first attempt. I made a pinboard as inspiration to really up my mom-style game this winter. Check the “Hudson Jogger” section to see where I gained lots of styling ideas. I’ll be adding to the pinboard over the next month or so as I continue to sew and style these Pinterest-inspired looks!

Side Note: Be sure to read to the end about the three different v-neck tees I made and how the different types of knit fabric changed the fit and overall look of the top.

Joggers & Classic Tee

I saw this super chic yet comfortably styled gal on Pinterest and immediately knew I could re-create the look with three super basic patterns. For the cardigan I used the M4M Darcey (you may recognize it from my fall capsule wardrobe). For the shirt, I sewed up the Classic Tee from Love Notions in a slinky white knit from Joann. My first attempt at pants in 2019 was the Hudson Pants from True Bias in a stretch twill from Joann.

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I styled the look to the inspiration from the Pinterest pic- nude heels and my computer glasses. PS. There are pockets ❤

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I love this outfit for a few reasons: 1. I feel super put together. Like super chic, super sophisticated and that I am not “just a mom.” 2. These pants are basically pjs which means I can wear them literally ALL day long. To bed, to school drop off, to work, and then back to bed. 3. This outfit can transition throughout the seasons simply by changing the shoes and the layers. Such great staple pieces added to my wardrobe!

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The second classic tee I made was with this thick, interlock knit from Cloud 9 Organics. I paired it with my go-to jean jacket and my new platform tennies (both from TJ Maxx). On a typical day, this is more of the momiform that I sport.

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And for my last Classic Tee & Joggers ensemble…I like to call this the “third day hair” look…you know when you get a few days in on not washing your hair and you just need a hat to make things better again! I went for a side knot of this Classic Tee sewn in AGF jersey knit.

All three looks are easy, comfortable and can transition from season to season. I love adding practical, staple pieces to my handmade wardrobe that still help me to feel stylish and put together.

Knit Comparison

I thought it was interesting to see a side-by-side of the three tees and how the different types of knit changed the drape, fit and overall look of the tee. The white fabric being the thinnest, slinkiest knit meant it fit bigger and draped away from my body more. The light grey was the thickest, less stretchy knit and that caused it to bit a stiffer and more boxy look. The dark grey was the middle of the the three knits with slight drape but still a bit of substance. When shopping for knit, it’s important to consider the properties of the particular knit and how it will effect the way your garment fits and hangs on your body.


Thanks for reading about my Classic Tee & Joggers sew! You can always see more behind the scenes, progress pics and hear about my sewing plans by watching my instastories and scrolling my feed on Instagram.

What tee/jogger combo did you like the most? I’d love to hear your feedback in the comments below!

Summer Sewing with Tallinn Fabrics {Blog Tour}

Hey friends!!! I’m joining the talent-packed Tallinn Fabrics blog tour hosted by Jessica Swift for her debut fabric collection with Art Gallery Fabrics.

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If you haven’t been following along, hop back to her intro post here. The full tour schedule is at the end of this post, but before you go…let’s take a look at what I sewed up!

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You all have heard by now that my girls are really loving knit dresses because they are comfy, easy to put on and off and wash/dry without any ironing. Wait. Maybe I’m the one that loves the whole not ironing thing! HA!

I love playing with some good ol’ pattern mashing and hacking so I decided to sew up a Kennedy (woven pattern) with this super cute knit! To alter this pattern for a nice, fitted knit dress I simply took off the extra ease from the back bodice center and the waistband. Instead of a button placket, I sewed the back bodice together in the center, and made the waistband in the round. For the skirt, I kept true to the pattern pieces but chose to gather the skirt rather than pleat. I was afraid of the pleats would be finicky and stretch out while sewing so I took the easy route!

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Once I saw the colors and detail in the Baltic Swans Sand print, I just had to have it!!! I love the green and pink combo with the dark swan and light background contrast.

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I’m so thrilled to be a part of this great tour! I hope you enjoyed my stop and reading about how you can take this woven dress and make it with knit!

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Thursday April 19 – Mathew Boudreaux | Mister Domestic

Friday April 20 – Katie Skoog | The Simple Life Company

Monday April 23 – Sharon Holland

Tuesday April 24 – Eleri Kerian | Sew and Tell Project

Wednesday April 25 – Paola Baker | Love of Fabrics

Thursday April 26 – Maureen Cracknell

Friday April 27 – Alexis Wright | My Sweet Sunshine Studio

Monday April 30 – Isabelle Selak | South Bay Bella Studio

Tuesday May 1 – Cassie Massolia | Lily Shine Creates

Wednesday May 2 – Becca Plymale | Sunflower Seams

Thursday May 3 – Alisa Kutsel | A Stitch In Between

Friday May 4 – Sharon McConnell | Color Girl Quilts

Monday May 7 – Karen O’Connor | Lady K Quilt Designs

Tuesday May 8 – Sarai Schuk | Sarai’s Hobbies

Wednesday May 9 – Elise Baek | Elise & Emelie

Thursday May 10Jessica Swift

Friday May 11Gwyn LaSpina

Monday May 14 – Loni Jakubowski | Havin Sew Much Fun

 

{Sewing with Denim} The Perfect Fitting Pant

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After the first Sewing with Denim post, many readers brought up concerns in sewing pants for themselves or their children. Many also made comments that pants patterns seem intimidating and measurements all over the board mean size mashing is needed. Don’t worry, friends! I’ve got you!!! In this blog post we’ll talk about the anatomy of a pant (I don’t know if that’s a thing but I’m calling it that!), how to reference a size chart and how to modify a pants pattern for the perfect fit. This post is meant to be easy for a beginner to read and put into practice, but at the end of the post I’ll be linking up other great resources for more in-depth alterations that may be needed! Let’s get to it!


The Anatomy of the Pant Pattern

Let’s take a look at the key part of the pant pattern that you will want to pay close attention to when mashing sizes or altering a pattern for a better fit. For example sake, I’ve created a general pattern piece for a pant front and back, please note that it is not intended for real use.

Parts of PantsSide Seam: This is the part of the pant that is on the outside of the legs from the waist to the hem, where the front and the back pant pieces are joined.

Inseam: This is the part of the pant that runs along the inside of the legs, from the crotch to the hem.

Front rise: This is the curve of the pant that runs along the front from the waist to the crotch.

Back rise: This is the curve of the pant that runs along the front from the waist to the crotch. Usually the back rise is longer than the front to accommodate the bum!


Measuring for a Better Fit

Taking accurate measurements and using those measurements to reference a size chart is critical in sewing a great fitting garment. There are a few key measurements needed in order to help choose the correct size(s) to use when cutting out your pants pattern.

Measuring Pants

Waist: Measure around the wearer where the top of the pant will sit. Keep in mind that usually a waistband is added, so measure lower for the top of the pant versus the top of the waistband.

Hip: Measure around the wearer at the fullest part of the hip. The hip measurement is usually take between the waist and the crotch.

Thigh: Measure around the fullest part of the wearer’s leg.

Knee: Measure around the wearer’s knee.

Inseam: Measure from the crotch to where you’d like the hem to hit along the inside of the wearer’s leg.

Leg opening: Measure around the wearer’s ankle, allowing for ease to fit the foot through the leg opening.

After taking these measurements, reference the size chart for the pants pattern you’d like to use. Keep in mind size charts vary by designer so just because the wearer needs a size 4 for one company doesn’t mean they will need a size 4 for another.

When referencing the size chart, find where the wearer’s measurements fall for each of the key points mentioned above. Specifics such as the knee and leg opening may not be included. You can use those measurements and the size chart to mash sizes for each of those key points if needed.


Mashing for a Better Fit

Since most people don’t fit the same standard size according to a size chart for their waist, hip, thigh and inseam, mashing multiple sizes is needed for a great fitting garment. Let’s look at a specific example and some tips for mashing multiple sizes. Note: This technique works best when mashing among 2-3 sizes. If further mashing is needed, a muslin is suggested with custom alterations for the most perfect fit. Mashing Pants

In this specific example, let’s say size 4 is blue, size 5 is green and size 6 is yellow. The black lines drawn in is the new custom pattern piece. Note that the sizes are nested with the crotch points aligned. This will make for easy mashing. If you have a pants pattern where that point is not aligned, you may want to cut out each size, align them at the crotch point and tape them together before starting to mash.

If the wearer has a size 4 waist, size 5 hip and thigh and a size 6 length, mashing will help you sew pants that will fit the wearer nicely.

Start by marking the length. You’ll want to keep the rise, the inseam and the side seam a size 6 (for this example). If you alter the rise, inseam or side seam to be any shorter than the needed length, you will end up with pants that are too short or sit too low on the wearer. If your wearer needs a shorter length than their width size, draw horizontal lines across the pattern pieces at the size for the length.

Next, mark the waist. You’ll simply extend the size 4 waist line up to the size 6 for this example.

Then, mark the hip, thigh and leg opening. You’ll draw a curve from the waist markings out to the size 5 hip, thigh and down the pant leg. You follow the same process along the rise and inseam of the pant.

Note any of these alterations will need to be transferred to other pattern pieces such as the waistband, hem facing, pockets, etc.

Once you’ve customized the pattern piece at the waist, hip, thigh, etc. you’ll cut the pattern pieces out along those new lines and get to sewing!


I hope you found some helpful tips and tricks in this post. Sometimes even further alterations are needed but get to be a bit more complicated and are geared towards the advanced sewist. Some helpful links for problem areas are included below.

A great video on altering the crotch length.

A full thigh alteration plus other great tips.

A Craftsy class for altering pants.

For more precise altering for jeans (this is geared towards ladies’ wear)

How to alter for cloth diapers.

 

{Introduction} Sewing with Denim

Hey sewing friends! I’d like to begin the New Year with several series to help you build confidence in sewing apparel and to encourage you to try new things. First up, we’ll be taking a look at sewing with denim! Let’s start by learning a little bit about denim and taking a look at various types and weights of denim that are great for apparel.


What are denim fabrics?

Denim fabrics are sturdy fabrics with a particular woven construction. Typically denim is made from indigo and white yarn but over time the term has come to reference various colors other than just blue.

What are the various types of denim best for apparel? I love using Art Gallery Fabrics denims for clothing. Let’s see their denim studio offerings:

  • Classic Denim
    • 100% Cotton
    • 4.5 oz/sqm weight
  • Textured Denim
    • 100% Cotton
    • 10 oz/sqm weight
  • Smooth Denim
    • 80% Cotton 20% Polyester
    • 4.5 oz/sqm weight
  • Linen Blends
    • 55% Linen 45% Cotton
    • 220 g/sqm weight
  • Lovey Dobby
    • 100% Cotton
    • 123 g/sqm weight
  • Crosshatch Textured Denim
    • 100% Cotton
    • 10 oz/sqm weight
  • Outland Yarn Dyes
    • 100% Cotton
    • 4 oz/sqm
  • Streaked Blend
    • 65% Cotton 34% Polyester 1% Spandex
    • 5 oz/sqm

When selecting the denim that is right for your project, pay attention to the weight of the fabric (shown typically in g/sqm).

Lightweight fabrics will be less than 150 g/sqm. You’ll want to choose lightweight fabrics for apparel that needs to have a good flow or will be fully lined. Ideas for apparel items: blouses, flowy skirts, children’s apparel, etc.

Medium weight fabrics are usually between 150 & 300 g/sqm. Medium weight fabrics are great for apparel patterns that need some structure but also allow for movement. Ideas for apparel items: pants, jackets, structured skirts, etc.

Heavy weight fabrics will be 300+ g/sqm. Typically heavy weight fabrics aren’t the best for kids apparel, so I tend to steer clear of them.

You’ll also want to pay attention to the fabric content. Any denims that include spandex (like the Streaked Blend from AGF) will have some stretch to it. Denims that have a combination of cotton and polyester will typically have less wrinkling or will shrink less in the wash.

You can read more about the various AGF denim offerings on their blog.

Here are some of my favorite denims. Simply click the photo (affiliate link) to shop. I’m curious if you recognize these fabrics from any of my previous sews????


Over the next few weeks I’ll be sharing sewing projects made from each type of denim offered by AGF. Which type of denim listed above are you most excited to see?? Leave me a note in the comments below!

In the meantime, shop around to find what type of denim you’ll need for your next apparel sewing project. You can also check out my Pinterest board I’ll be using during this series for more inspiration!

Blush Fabrics {Blog Tour}

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Hello friends!!! I’m back on the blog today to share my latest make with the most gorgeous Rayon print from Blush Fabrics by Dana Willard for Art Gallery Fabrics. Dana reached out to a great batch of sewing bloggers to join in on the fun with the Blush Fabrics blog tour! It has been so awesome to see what others have sewn up (and so many in this same print!) over the last several days. If you want to check them out, search the hashtag #blushfabrics and see what great things have been popping up on Instagram lately!

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For the tour, I decided to play with the rayon substrate. I *love* AGF Rayon because it’s got the most perfect flow and drape for maxi dresses. And in my house, maxi dresses = ultimate princess dress = mom of the year!

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I used Alexis’ newest pattern, Zoey, for Violette Field Threads with slight modifications (aka late night sewing and I tried to find a shortcut). Instead of finishing the bodice with bias along the neckline, ties and the front placket I decided to sew a lined bodice and add pom trim for the neck ties. A super simple modification that saved me lots of time and turned out super cute!

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This maxi dress made for the perfect dancing, twirling, and moody grinning attire!

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I hope you enjoyed seeing the new Zoey maxi I sewed up with the Floret Rayon in Sunkissed print from Blush Fabrics. Big hugs and a sweet “Thank You” to Dana and our AGF friends!!!! My girls adore this retro, pink and blue collection! Keep scrolling to see some more Blush Fabric makes on my girlies!!!

{Friday Favorites} Summer Fabric Edition

Hey all!!! I constantly see posts in the Violette Field Threads Facebook Group and other groups about what fabrics are trending, where to buy seasonal prints, etc. So, I thought I would start rounding up my favorites each week and share with you all what is hot, coming soon or should be in your cart NOW!

Because we’re half way through summer, I figured I’d squeeze in one summer fabric post and share what I’ve sewn with this season and what’s in my cart to finish out the warm weather! I’ve added links to each print via amazon (affiliate links) so you can just click and shop away! Let’s get this party started!!!

First up, the fruit trend is still is blazing hot from last year.

Art Gallery Fabrics features some of my favorites!

 

 

A great pattern to use with citrus prints would be the VFT Alice Dress.

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I am totally digging these lemons too!!!

Another great summer fabric trend this year was southwest inspired prints such as these:

The new Kaitlynn dress from Violette Field Threads is the perfect pairing for these southwest inspired prints!

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Last but not least (and you know my personal favorite this year), this summer is all about the dainty floral print!

The soft hues are perfect for warm summer days!

These gentle blues remind me of the ocean.


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Alright! Come back next week and we’ll talk back to school prints and patterns!!!

XOXO and Happy Sewing!

Bountiful Fabrics for Kate

Hey friends! Today’s post isn’t for anything special other than just a regular ol’ “check out what I made” photo bomb! Sometimes, it feels good to just create for the sake of creating, without any other agenda or deadline.

The lovely ladies at Violette Field Threads are going through some of their older patterns and adding in new features, a more precise fit to their measurement charts and of course, the layer printing option! An update to Kate will be coming soon so in anticipation, I sewed up a Kate in all is country-charm cuteness with the new Bountiful fabrics from Sharon Holland for Art Gallery Fabrics.

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Kate is a jam-packed pattern: A dress or top option, a scalloped apron, and a handkerchief style headband.

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How perfect was the Myrtle Creek Botanical Gardens & Nursery for this shoot? I was so glad I brought this outfit with us when we were photographing for the Fiesta Fun blog tour!

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I added some of the beautiful flowers from the Perennial Renewal print in a free motion appliqué to the apron for some fun flair.

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Kate and Bountiful were a match made in sewing heaven! I just adore how sweet this outfit turned out…so here are some more photos to admire!

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Big thanks to our friends over at Art Gallery Fabrics and special sweet hugs to Sharon Holland for sharing her amazing fabrics with us!

Keep an eye out for the upcoming Kate update from Violette Field Threads and start dreaming up your next sew!

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Fiesta Fun Fabrics {Blog Tour}

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Hey all!!!! If you’re anything like me, as soon as those temperatures start creeping up after a long winter and the sun starts shining longer into the evening hours, your creative soul begins eagerly planning for summer sewing! Right?? Good news- Fiesta Fun Fabrics are out in your favorite quilt shops and online fabric stores such as Hawthorne Threads and are screaming all things summer! I am so honored and excited to be a part of a stellar blog tour showcasing some of our favorite prints from the Fiesta Fun Fabrics collection by Dana Willard of Made Everyday for Art Gallery Fabrics. Alexis of My Sweet Sunshine and I got together for a festive afternoon at a local Botanical Garden. Let’s take a look at our fun shoot:

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What a trio of cuteness, right??? For my oldest daughter’s outfit I sewed up an Allie top with the Piñata Confetti print, trimmed with bright blue mini poms. I played with the incredible canvas from the collection in the *updated* Fawn shorts pattern.

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Thanks Target (and Alexis) for these perfectly perfect sunnies and headband- it’s like they knew we needed some props for this blog tour!

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Alexis sewed up the most darling dress in the Citrus Sunrise print- I seriously want to make one for myself!!!

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And for my youngest, a June dress sewn also with the canvas print. I haven’t made a dress with canvas before but the Art Gallery canvas has a great drape and structure, but still gathered up just fine for the full skirt. How fun!!!

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And because I can’t ever keep my posts short and sweet…here are some more photos of our day!

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Thanks for checking out my stop on the tour! Be sure to hop back to the Blog Tour Kickoff Post and check out all the other amazing makes with Fiesta Fun Fabrics!

Big thanks to our friends from Art Gallery Fabrics, and big squishy hugs to Dana for including us in the tour! Happy Sewing!

{Sage Fabrics} Mae and the Desert

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Hey there!!! I’m here to *finally* share with you some more Sage fabric love!!! Back in February, I released the Mae pettiskirt pattern with Violette Field Threads. The original intent for the Mae pattern was to be a super full, fluffy skirt that would layer great under other VFT pieces for added flair and fluff! But, I also wanted to make some everyday Mae skirts for my girls to wear as standalone skirts. SageMae5

Woah. Did you see that??? Your eyes are not deceiving you; those are not two different skirts. Yes, folks- that is a [reversible] Mae!!!! Because when you have to ruffle that much, you better get two skirts for the work of one, right?? HA! The reversible option is included in the pattern and is a great way to really maximize your sewing efforts!

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And when you have lovely fabrics like these two prints from the Sage Fabrics collection by Bari J for Art Gallery Fabrics, a reversible skirt is the perfect way to showcase that beauty!

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I used the Bougainvillea Lilac print for one side. I love the deep jewel tones and contrast in colors. And, since we live in sunny SoCal, I had to sew up some of the Coyote and Quail in Lavender for the reverse side.

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We had to take a trip to the gorgeous Cactus Garden in Balboa park- the most perfect setting to really compliment the Southwest flora and fauna featured in the fabrics.

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The Allie top in a white linen blend was the perfect pairing for the Mae Skirt. Pick up both patterns with coupon code “SPRINGDRESS” to save 15% this weekend only!